October 2010

Audrey Hepburn (1929 – 1993)

By |October 8th, 2010|

Audrey Hepburn grew up in Holland during World War II and began life with great uncertainty—not knowing when she would see her estranged father, where her next meal would come from, or even whether she would survive the war. Dance was her refuge and […]

Katharine Hepburn (1907 – 2003)

By |October 8th, 2010|

Broadway producers thought Katharine Hepburn was too much the individual to achieve stardom, but she caught the eye of director George Cukor, who offered her the lead in A Bill of Divorcement (1932). Despite her early success in that film and in Morning Glory […]

Lauren Bacall (1924 – )

By |October 8th, 2010|

One of the screen’s most independent women, Lauren Bacall grew up in a middle-class family in the Bronx. Her childhood interest in dance gave way to a passion for acting early on, and she studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, where the […]

Ingrid Bergman (1915 – 1982)

By |October 8th, 2010|

As a shy, young orphan in Sweden, Ingrid Bergman dreamed of becoming an actress. She started appearing in films while still a teenager, eventually rising to stardom. Her film Intermezzo (1936), in which she played a classical pianist in love with a married violinist, […]

Joan Crawford (1904 – 1977)

By |October 8th, 2010|

Joan Crawford spent much of her early movie career playing shopgirls Short on cash but long on moxie who talked and occasionally danced their way to a better life. These were characters near but not dear to her heart; her own divorced mother had […]

Bette Davis (1908 – 1989)

By |October 8th, 2010|

Bette Davis was shocked when Hollywood first came calling. She had never thought a world that worshipped beauties like Jean Harlow would take an interest in her. Yet her confidence grew with each picture until, insecure about her talent no longer, she was like […]

Humphrey Bogart (1899 – 1957)

By |October 8th, 2010|

When the Brattle Theatre, near Harvard, started its annual revivals of Casablanca (1942) in the sixties, students showed up for screenings dressed as Rick Blaine, their trench coats and snap-brim hats mirroring Humphrey Bogart’s screen image just as his tough-guy pose mirrored their own […]

Marlon Brando (1924 – 2004)

By |October 8th, 2010|

Brando was one of the key figures to introduce a new, more personal approach to acting in the fifties. Although he never considered himself a Method actor, he had studied with New York teacher Stella Adler, who taught him to create impressively realistic performances […]

Montgomery Clift (1920 – 1966)

By |October 8th, 2010|

The life of Montgomery Clift is one of Hollywood’s most tragic stories. In many ways the sensitivity and emotional openness that made him a star in films like A Place in the Sun (1951) and From Here to Eternity (1953) contributed to his fall […]

Laurence Olivier (1907 – 1989)

By |October 8th, 2010|

Laurence Olivier didn’t just create characters; he created “the universe in the palm of his hands,” one of his own definitions of acting. Graced with the ability to disappear inside even the showiest role, he transformed himself into a series of unforgettable characters. Through […]